eARC Review: Fourteen Summers by Quinn Anderson

Fourteen Summers by Quinn Anderson.png

cover133102-mediumFourteen Summers by Quinn Anderson
Published by:
 Riptide Publishing

Publication Date:  May 21st 2018
Genres: New Adult, LGBTQ+, Romance
Format: eBook
Rating: 4 Stars
Date Read: 7/06/2018
Links: Goodreads NetgalleyBooktopia

Identical twins Aiden and Max Kingsman have been a matched set their whole lives. When they were children, Aiden was happy to follow his extroverted brother’s lead, but now that they’re in college, being “my brother, Aiden” is starting to get old. He’s itching to discover who he is outside of his “twin” identity.

Oliver’s goals for the summer are simple: survive his invasive family, keep his divorced parents from killing each other, and stay in shape for rowing season. He’s thrilled when he runs into his old friends, the Kingsman twins, especially Aiden, the object of a childhood crush. Aiden is all grown-up, but some things have stayed the same: his messy curls, his stability, and how breathless he makes Oliver. Oliver’s crush comes back full force, and the feeling is mutual. Summer just got a whole lot hotter.

Fun-loving Max takes one thing seriously: his role as “big brother.” When Aiden drifts away, Max can’t understand how his own twin could choose a boy over him. Summer won’t last forever, and with friendship, family, and happily ever after on the line, they’ll have to navigate their changing relationships before it’s too late. 

Fourteen Summers is a coming-of-age tale that encompasses many different types of relationships- romantic, familial, and friendship. This book wasn’t quite what I was expecting, but I enjoyed it, nonetheless. The story was told from three points of view, Aiden’s, Max’s and Oliver’s. This was a new adult novel. The characters are all 20 years old and trying to find their way as adults. As readers, we get to watch their struggle with balancing family obligations and romantic relationships. 

As identical twins, Aiden and Max have always had a built-in support system, best friend, and constant companion, perhaps causing an unhealthy codependency. They were both devastated when their childhood best friend moved away, but they had each other. 

Twin brothers Max and Aiden Kingsman spent their childhood inseparable from their best friend Oliver until the day Oliver’s parent’s divorced and he moved away. Now fourteen years later, Max and Aiden are home from college for the summer when they run into none other than Oliver who is in town visiting this dad. The three start hanging out again and it’s just like old times, including that embarrassing crush Aiden has always had on Oliver. But Aiden doesn’t realize that Oliver also used to have a crush on Aiden and now that he’s found him again, Oliver isn’t wasting any time making his feelings known.

“I need your humour. I need your support. And I need you to get me to put on real clothes and leave the house every now and then, because otherwise I’ll become one of those weird recluses with twelve pet reptiles who writes articles about how millennials are killing the sock industry.”

This story has such a great dynamic. It is about family, love, friendship and acceptance. I really enjoyed seeing the boys figure out what they wanted personally and from each other.

The characters, their portrayals, felt realistic to me for the most part. The novel was sweet and warm, yet had it’s moments when it became highly emotional. The realism was shown via Max’s interactions, as he was able to force the reader to step out of the warm and fuzzy romance and angst and show a different type of relationship, that of twin brothers and of best friends. 

The story was well-written and enjoyable. I loved all three of the characters and Oliver and Aiden were really sweet together. The relationship between Aiden and Oliver is sweet and desperate, that desperation where two people realise what they want and don’t want to wait another minute to have it. Aiden and Oliver were both so introverted and awkward which I absolutely loved. As an introvert myself I could totally relate.

This was what happened when two introverts tried to flirt. They ended up with a lot of awkward silences and not-staring contests while they each waited to see if the other one was going to make a move. If Oliver gave Aiden one more lingering look from afar, he was going to become the protagonist of a YA novel.

I was so excited when I was approved for an ARC of this book, because the cover is adorable, and the blurb sucked me right in. If you’re worried the actual book won’t hold up, don’t be. From the tone-setting prologue to the oh-so-satisfying epilogue, this book was amazing. I finished this book in less than 24 hours. It’s Well written. Emotional. Steamy. Sexy. Romantic. With the perfect blend of cuteness, angst, and fumbling through life.

I was totally drawn into Aiden, Max and Oliver’s story and couldn’t put it down once I started. It was funny and heartwarming with a tiny bit of angst and drama along the way. Fourteen Summers left me feeling happy for all of the main characters with a case of the warm fuzzys once I reached the end.

Overall, Fourteen Summers was a lot more than I was expecting. Not to mention, the ending is adorable and I love the full-circle nature of the story. Fourteen Summers is a beautifully written M/M romance. The book ends with a super sweet epilogue, and that’s all I’m going to say about that.

Chat With Me

That’s it for this review! Have you read this book? If so, What did you think of it? Is it on your TBR? Tell me in the comments if you agree or disagree with any of this. I’d love to know your opinion. 

 

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2 Responses to eARC Review: Fourteen Summers by Quinn Anderson

  1. mudandstars says:

    Great review! This sounds so good that I’ve just gone and downloaded it on my Kindle straight away! Can’t wait to read it 🙂

    Like

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