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January 2018 Wrap Up & Book Haul

August Wrap-Up & Haul (1)

It is time for another wrap-up! As Usual I will not be putting down all the books I read this month here, I have a separate Wrap-up coming soon for that. I’ll Link all th

Reviews Finished this Month:

The BFG by Roald Dahl 
White Cat by Holly Black 
Everything Leads to you by Nina LaCour 
Stancliffe’s Hotel by Charlotte Bronte 
Babe: The Gallant Pig by Dick King-Smith 
Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator by Roald Dahl 
Crimson Shell by Jun Mochizuki 
Pawn by Aimee Carter 
Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf

Tags/Memes/Awards Done this Month:

The Sunday Post #34: Tasmania Trip – 21/01/2018 
The Sunday Post #35: Weekly Update – 28/01/2018

TBRs & Wrap ups:

Manga Madness Read-a-thon TBR 
January 2018 TBR 
Manga Madness Read-a-thon Wrap up 
January 2018 Wrap Up – Readathons

Other Posts done this Month:

2018 Reading & Blogging Goals 
Book Haul/TBR Revisit #2 
2018 Reading Challenges 
Read Along Announcement: The Grisha Trilogy by Leigh Bardugo

Book Haul:

I didn’t acquire too many books this month, which is a good thing, as I’m trying to cut back on my book buying and get through a lot of my TBR. So this month I got 7 Books; 4 Books I Bought, 2 were from a Subscription Box and 1 I received as a review Copy from a publisher.

Physical Books I Bought:

Deltora Quest #3 by Emily Rodda
Wonderland: Alice in Poetry
Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie

Books I received:

Valentine by Jodi McAlister
The Cruel Prince by Holly Black
The Whispering Room by Dean Koontz

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That’s it for this post! I’ll be doing my February TBR separately. So if you would like to know which books I’m planning on reading next Month, or Which read-a-thons I’m participating in, check back tomorrow! What books did you Acquire in January? Any January Blog Posts you would like me to check out? I would love to know. If you have your own Book Haul or Wrap-Up post(s), leave them down below as well.

Click on the links to go to the goodreads pages to find out more about the books and authors.

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January 2018 Wrap Up (#JanJamJar, #Winterbibib, #24in48, #Randomathon)

October TBR (9).png

January Jam Jar (#JanJamJar)

(Monday, January 1st – Wednesday, January 31)

I participated in January Jam Jar, which is hosted by Kathy @ Books and Munches. Here are the books I ended up reading this month:

All the Crooked Saints by Maggie Stiefvater
Summer Days & Summer Nights, Edited by Stephanie Perkins

Biannual Bibliothon (#Winterbibib)

(Saturday, January 20th – Friday, January 26th)

Last week was the Winter Biannual Bibliothon. So, here I is how I did! This read-a-thon is hosted by a ton of lovely ladies whom have a Youtube channel dedicated to this read-a-thon.

The reading challenges:

  1. Read the group book: Otherworld by Jason Segel and Kirsten Miller
  2. Read a sequel
  3. Read a book you’ve never heard of before
  4. Read a book about mental illness
  5. Read a book that was mentioned in another book/movie/tv show – Death Note Volume 2
  6. Read a book under 200 pages – A Modern Detective by Edgar Allan Poe
  7. Read a backlist title – All the Crooked Saints by Maggie Stiefvater

24in48 (#24in48)

(Saturday, January 27th – Sunday, January 28th)

Queen by Aimee Carter
The Last Place by Michael Adams
Trust me, I’m Lying by Mary Elizabeth Summer
Death Note Volume 3

Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Grey Woman by Elizabeth Gaskell
To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before by Jenny Han
Summer Days & Summer Nights, Edited by Stephanie Perkins

Randomathon (#Randomathon)

(Saturday, January 27th – Wednesday, January 31th)

Hosted by , The Challenges:

Read a Thriller –
Read a Harry Potter book
Read a book that takes place on another planet –
Read a book that you think will be a 5 Star read – Death Note Volume 3
Read a book that doesn’t take place in America – The Last Place by Michael Adams

Non-Readathon Reads

The Bane Chronicles by Cassandra Clare
Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman
The Haunted Heart of America by Logan Corelli
More Happy Than Not by Adam Silvera
Simon Vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertelli
Call me by your Name by André Aciman

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That’s it for this post! Have you read any of these books? Thoughts? Did you Participate in any of these Read-a-thons? If you have your own Wrap-up for January or any of these read-a-thons, leave them down below as well, I’d love to check them out.

Click on the links to go to the goodreads pages to find out more about the books and authors.

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The Sunday Post #35: Weekly Update – 28/01/2018

The Sunday PostWeekly Update

The Sunday post is a weekly meme hosted by Kimba @ the Caffeinated Book Reviewer. It’s a chance to share news – A post to recap the past week on your blog and showcase books and things we have received. Share news about what is coming up on our blog for the week ahead.

Books Read:

Currently Reading:

What I Plan to Read Next:

Emma @ EmmmaBooks is hosting a Year-long Read Along for The Shadowhunter Academy, so I’ll joining and re-reading the Series! I am so Excited to be re-reading this series. If you are interested definitely go Check out her Video. And there will also be Liveshows to Discuss each of the Books.

Song of the Week:

What I’m Watching:

Last Week on the Blog:

Review: Pawn by Aimee Carter 
Review: Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf 
Read Along Announcement: The Grisha Trilogy by Leigh Bardugo

Upcoming Reviews:

Around the Blogosphere:

Mikaela @ The Well-Thumbed Reader talks about whether Blog Hopping can be a Burden
Laura @ Reading Santuary shares her Most Anticipated Sequels of 2018
Lia @ Lost in a Story shares A Guide to ARCs

Follow Me Here:

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What books did you finish this Week? What are you Currently Reading? What are you planning on reading next. If you have your own Sunday Post, leave the link down below as well.

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Read Along Announcement: The Grisha Trilogy by Leigh Bardugo

The Grisha Trilogy Read Along

Okay, Today I’m here with a quick Announcement! So, apparently I’ve been living under a rock. There’s this series everyone’s been raving about. And here I am and I’ve yet to read it. I don’t know about you, but I hate being left out of the loop. I’ve had these books on my Shelf for Months. So I’ve decided to Binge-Read the Series and I thought why not do a Read Along. I figured it was time to read the series and I want all of you to join me.

grisha-trilogy-covers.jpg

I will be hosting this read-along from February 8th – February 28th. February 8th to the 15th, we will be reading Book 1: Shadow and Bone. February 16th to the 22nd, we will be reading Book 2: Siege and Storm. And February 23rd to the 28th we will be reading Book 3: Ruin and Rising. Of Course you do not have to go by this schedule, you can create your own schedule or whatever works for you between these dates.

All posts should be tagged with #GrishaTrilogyReadAlong so we can all see everyone’s posts and progress and talk about these books, our thoughts, edits, photos, reviews and anything else relating to this series. I will be going through the tag everyday and seeing everyone’s progress and interacting throughout the entire read-along. You Can also follow me @CoffeeAndBook18

If you’re already a fan of the series, this is a great time to re-read the Series. If you’ve not yet tried the series, this is the perfect time to get on-board. In addition to discussions about each Book, I’m also doing fun topic discussions.

Please just try to keep it spoiler free if you want to talk about the books. Or if you think it might be a Spoiler, add a Spoiler Tag to your posts as everyone reads at different Speeds.

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Are you going to be Joining me in reading the Grisha Trilogy? Will you be re-reading it? Or reading it for the first time? Let me know in the Comments!

Happy reading! I look forward to reading this series with you all and Seeing all the Grisha posts in February! I hope you’ll be joining me in my endeavours in reading this series and discussing it. Also, One other thing, after each book I’ll have discussions up on my Blog here, If you’re interested in that. Let me know if you’re interesting in this or if you’d be interested in me doing more of these in the Future!

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Review: Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf

Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf

Mrs DallowayMrs. Dalloway by Dick King-Smith
Published By: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt                           Publication Date: October 28th 2002 (first published 1923)
Genres: Classic, Fiction, Literature
Format: Paperback
Pages: 194
Rating: 4 Stars
Date Read: 09/10/2017
Links: Goodreads

Mrs. Dalloway chronicles a June day in the life of Clarissa Dalloway–a day that is taken up with running minor errands in preparation for a party and that is punctuated, toward the end, by the suicide of a young man she has never met. In giving an apparently ordinary day such immense resonance and significance–infusing it with the elemental conflict between death and life–Virginia Woolf triumphantly discovers her distinctive style as a novelist. Originally published in 1925, Mrs. Dalloway is Woolf’s first complete rendering of what she described as the “luminous envelope” of consciousness: a dazzling display of the mind’s inside as it plays over the brilliant surface and darker depths of reality.

Virginia Woolf takes us through a single day in 1923 in post-World War I London. She does so with gorgeous prose and a stream of consciousness writing that takes us directly into the minds of both Clarissa Dalloway herself as well as those to whom she comes in contact. It is as if one could hear every little musing and wandering thought process of each person we encounter in any ordinary day.

As Clarissa makes preparations for an evening party, she reflects on her past, her present and her future. Time itself plays a large role in this novel.

“The clock was striking. The leaden circles dissolved in the air.”

When a former lover, Peter Walsh, returns to England from India, Clarissa contemplates her own identity. She examines her view of her inner self in relation to the scrutiny of Peter Walsh and what she believes he thinks of her. She perceives that he thinks of her as being empty and only interested in social concerns, prosperity and parties. She frequently ponders death and what her own death would mean in the context of the life she has lived.

“Did it matter then, she asked herself, walking towards Bond Street, did it matter that she must inevitably cease completely; all this must go on without her; did she resent it; or did it not become consoling to believe that death ended absolutely? but that somehow in the streets of London, on the ebb and flow of things, here, there, she survived, Peter survived, lived in each other, she being part, she was positive, of the trees at home; of the house there, ugly, rambling all to bits and pieces as it was; part of people she had never met; being laid out like a mist between the people she knew best, who lifted her on their branches as she had seen the trees lift the mist, but it spread ever so far, her life, herself.”

Undeniably, Virginia Woolf is a brilliant writer. I adored her previous work, A Room of One’s Own. Mrs. Dalloway is one I certainly respect as well. However, I found the flow of thought a bit more difficult in this compared to the other one that I’ve read thus far.

Another noteworthy aspect of Woolf’s writing is her acute description of post-traumatic stress disorder. PTSD was not formally recognized until the 1970s, and even though documentation of symptoms was common in the 1940s when World War II veterans were being treated for “mental disturbances,” the fact that Woolf delves into this subject as early as 1925 is pretty profound. Back then, shell shock meant that you were suffering from a form of “exhaustion,”

Mrs. Dalloway ultimately builds toward the title character’s dinner party, but I actually found this finale to be somewhat less interesting than the parts that came before. We’re introduced to many new characters in the final 25 pages, which, despite the fact that each one gets no more than a paragraph of time (and some must share), is something of a nuisance after becoming attached to five or six major players.

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That’s it for this review! Have you read this? If so, What did you think of it? Is it on your TBR? Tell me in the comments if you agree or disagree with any of this. I’d love to know your opinion.

 

 

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Review: Pawn by Aimee Carter

Pawn by Aimee Cart

PawnPawn by Aimee Carter
Publication Date: November 26th 2013
Published by: Harlequinn Teen
Series: The Blackcoat Rebellion, #1
Genres: Young Adult, Science Fiction
Format: Audiobook
Pages: 347
Rating: 3
Date Read: 19/11/2017
Links: Goodreads

YOU CAN BE A VII. IF YOU GIVE UP EVERYTHING.

For Kitty Doe, it seems like an easy choice. She can either spend her life as a III in misery, looked down upon by the higher ranks and forced to leave the people she loves, or she can become a VII and join the most powerful family in the country.

If she says yes, Kitty will be Masked—surgically transformed into Lila Hart, the Prime Minister’s niece, who died under mysterious circumstances. As a member of the Hart family, she will be famous. She will be adored. And for the first time, she will matter.

There’s only one catch. She must also stop the rebellion that Lila secretly fostered, the same one that got her killed …and one Kitty believes in. Faced with threats, conspiracies and a life that’s not her own, she must decide which path to choose—and learn how to become more than a pawn in a twisted game she’s only beginning to understand.

Pawn caught me off guard with the sheer amount of corruption, backstabbing, and manipulation there was. The book was like a chess game, where Kitty is wedged between two powerful people with opposing agendas. They think she’s just a pawn in their twisted game.

At first glance, Pawn sounds like your average dystopian, where it uses an aptitude test to determine what people become in life. Those assigned a ranking of III or below are doomed to a life of poverty and prostitution, while those with a VI or higher are given fame, fortune or a high ranking official status. But it’s so much more, as Kitty becomes Masked as the daughter of the most powerful family in the country, and that’s where the story really takes off.

It was refreshing to have the romance as a secondary focus in Pawn, letting the action and story take centre stage instead. Kitty and Benjy’s relationship started before the story begins, that way there’s no need to develop it further without making it into insta-love. Their romance is sweet and strong and even though Benjy is pretty much your cookie cutter protective boyfriend, it was great without the relationship drama. There’s no love triangle either which is a bonus.

“They had taken away my face and a name, but I’d thought there was no way they could take away who I really was.”

Pawn is one of the most exciting and refreshing dystopian’s I’ve read. Although the world building is limited, it’s the intrigue behind the twisted family agendas and Kitty’s stubborn streak that kept me reading. Without the frustrating YA elements, it was even better.

As this book is dystopian, it borrows themes from a lot of other dystopian novels, including but not limited to, The Hunger Games, The Selection, and Divergent. Now while it has some of these themes, it ends up seeming very unique and I couldn’t get enough of it.

“But if you’re careful—if you protect your pawns and they reach the other side of the board, do you know what happens then? Your pawn becomes a queen.”

Kitty is the weakest character in the book, in terms of believability. Her actions are completely stupid initially, but she grew to accept her fate. I am not criticizing the fact that she chooses to become a prostitute, I am criticizing her dubious choice of a very disturbing career.

Kitty’s character is supremely inconsistent. She is supposed to be smart, though dyslexic, which makes it difficult for her to learn written things. Given her learning disabilities and her lack of skills, it completely makes no sense to me that she plays the role of very upper-class, highly educated Lila almost flawlessly. Kitty becomes too perfect to be true, she is too damned adaptable to be real. That’s not to say I didn’t enjoy reading about her. Kitty was a strong heroine. I liked that her reactions were believable. When she heard of a rebellion that, if she joined, would put her life in danger, she wasn’t about to go near that. I think that’s a realistic reaction, which made Kitty seem more real. Of course, when she found out what was at stake, she knew she had to join for everyone’s sake. She was still quite likable.

It was there to give us what we deserved so we could make the most of our natural abilities. The smartest members of society could help people in ways that IIs and IIIs couldn’t, so they earned more. It was fair, and without the test, someone who had grown up in a disadvantaged family might never have their talents recognized.

I have always had a hard time with books that are overly political, but Carter has spun a very carefully crafted plot that has more then it’s share of twists and turns to keep the readers guessing.

I really love the fact that we have an already established romance. I love watching characters fall in love in stories, but it’s really nice to be able to sink into how they already feel for one another and enjoy their moments between them without having to guess or worry about how things move along. Kitty and Benjy have a wonderfully sweet relationship that kept me committed throughout the story and thankfully there isn’t a love triangle insight.

“I’m never better off without you,” he said. “We’re in this together. I love you, and that’s never going to change, all right? I’m yours no matter what your rank is. You could be a I, and I would go Elsewhere just to find you.”

Overall, Pawn was a thrilling read, and no where near your typical dystopian. Aimee Carter managed to create a world that wasn’t a copy cat, and I could tell she put a lot of work into making the future society seem unique and complete. If you consider yourself a fan of dystopian novels, you should read this. This is not Hunger Games, but still I believe it will be one of the series that will offer us something worth reading.

I loved her, but I have a duty to my country. We all do. And I will not allow us to return to that dark time. My grandson will not go through what I did. No one ever will again

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That’s it for this review! Have you read this? If so, What did you think of it? Is it on your TBR? Tell me in the comments if you agree or disagree with any of this. I’d love to know your opinion.

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The Sunday Post #34: Tasmania Trip – 21/01/2018

The Sunday PostWeekly Update

The Sunday post is a weekly meme hosted by Kimba @ the Caffeinated Book Reviewer. It’s a chance to share news – A post to recap the past week on your blog and showcase books and things we have received. Share news about what is coming up on our blog for the week ahead.

What Happened off the Blog:

I went to Burnie, Tasmania with my Mum to visit my Sister, as I hadn’t seen her in over 2 years! We departed Adelaide for Melbourne and then headed to Tasmania on the Spirit of Tasmania, that’s about 20 Hours of Travel. Spirit of Tasmania is a ship that you can drive your car onto, so that you can hop off when you arrive in Tasmania and continue driving along and exploring.

We travelled as foot passengers, so we just boarded. The Spirit of Tasmania does both day trips or overnight trips. On the way over, we travelled overnight and on the way back we travelled during the day. We saw a lot of places like Stanley, Reliquaire, Romaine Reserve, Stanley SeaQuarium, House if Anvers Chocolate Factory and more…

Books Read:

Currently Reading:

What I Plan to Read Next:

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I recently got a physical copy of this book from The Never Never Subscription Box, if you’ve never heard of it, you should definitely check it out. It’s Australia’s First Spec-Fic Book Box. Each box comes with two Speculative Fiction titles, one in print and the other as an e-book; plus 3 – 5 pieces of bookish merchandise, which are really awesome and cute. All tailored around an awesome theme! I cannot wait to read this one!

New on my Shelf:

Song of the Week:

What I’m Watching:

Last Week on the Blog:

Manga Madness Read-a-thon Wrap up 
Review: Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator by Roald Dahl 
Manga Review: Crimson Shell by Jun Mochizuki

Coming Soon:

Monthly Recommendations: Best First Books in a Series
Different Ways To Write A Book Review

Upcoming Reviews:

Around the Blogosphere:

Aoife @ Pretty Purple Polka Dots shares Why she Loves reading YA Contemporary 
Analee @ Book Snacks talks about Quality Content and whether we put too much pressure on ourselves 
Chloe @ Diary of a Lonely Girl Chats about Responding To The Negativity! 
Lu @ Lu Reads shares What she’s learnt while Book Blogging

Follow Me Here:

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What books did you finish this Week? What are you Currently Reading? What are you planning on reading next. If you have your own Sunday Post, leave the link down below as well. Also, who else has watched any of the Movies mentioned above?

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Manga Review: Crimson Shell by Jun Mochizuki

Crimson Shell by Jun Mochizuki

6406025Crimson Shell by Jun Mochizuki
Published By: Yen Press      
Publication Date: November 17th 2009
Genres: Young Adult, Manga, Fantasy
Pages: 224
Rating: 3 Stars
Date Read: January 2018
Links: Goodreads | Booktopia | B&N | Book Depository | Amazon

If you like Pandora Hearts, then you’ll love Crimson-Shell, Jun Mochizuki-sensei’s debut! Rescued from the darkness by Xeno, a mysterious swordsman, Claudia the Rose Witch is the foundation of the Crimson-Shell, a special division of the Red Rose-an organization aiming to capture the results of one mad scientist’s experiments, the deadly Black Roses. But when Xeno’s loyalties are called into question, will Claudia be strong enough to believe in her dearest friend? And what is the colour of the rose blooming in Xeno’s heart-a deep, passionate crimson…or a traitorous jet-black?

Crimson Shell is a one volume manga by Pandora Hearts creator, Jun Mochizuki. Because Pandora Hearts is one of my favourite manga series, I was curious to read Mochizuki’s earlier work in Crimson Shell.

Crimson Shell centres around Claudia the Rose Witch and the mysterious and deadly Black Roses who wage war on her Red Rose organization searching for something they possess. Red Rose could be in trouble, because there seems to be a traitor about…

There are a lot of similarities between the two stories. The first similarity is the design of the characters – that girl could easily be Alice on the cover. Not surprisingly, the art style is the same. What is surprising is that for a first manga publication, Crimson Shell is very solid, with nice background art, good flow between panels, and a strong emotional connection with the characters.

Where Crimson Shell struggles is with pacing. The story concept is interesting (and I can definitely see elements that were pulled for use in Pandora Hearts), but it isn’t given enough time to fully develop. The result is a story that feels rushed and incomplete. I can’t complain, though, if this is the sounding board for Mochizuki to experiment with character development and story ideas that enable her to create Pandora Hearts.

This was pretty good. I wish it were a series, because I think there’s a lot to expand upon. I would’ve liked to see more, since there’s a lot of promise for this. This is a pleasantly ambitious story for a single volume, with a good number of characters, mystery elements, several twists and a plot important magic system. Overall it all works but it certainly could’ve benefitted from being somewhat longer, particularly in giving more details about the magic system and Red Rose organization and letting the tension build more. That said the intrigue and main plot are really well done.

Recommended for Pandora Hearts fans. If you want a taste of what Mochizuki can deliver in her beautiful stories, I recommend you check this out. Really, Crimson Shell is pretty good for a one shot manga. I wasn’t disappointed, and I enjoyed most of what Mochizuki had to offer.

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That’s it for this review! Have you read this? If so, What did you think of it? Is it on your TBR? Tell me in the comments if you agree or disagree with any of this. I’d love to know your opinion.      

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Review: Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator by Roald Dahl

Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator

517iuJrajoL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_Charlie & the Great Glass Elevator by Roald Dahl
Published by: Puffin Books
Genres: Children, Fiction
Format: Paperback
Pages: 177
Rating: 2 Stars
Date Read: 10/11/17
Links: Goodreads | Amazon | Author’s Website

Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator is the superb sequel to the ever-popular Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl.

Charlie Bucket has WON Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory and is on his way to take possession of it. In a great glass elevator! But when the elevator makes a fearful whooshing noise, Charlie and his family find themselves in splendid orbit around the Earth. A daring adventure has begun, with the one and only Mr Willy Wonka leading the way.

“A true genius . . . Roald Dahl is my hero” David Walliams

Roald Dahl, the best-loved of children’s writers, was born in Wales of Norwegian parents. After school in England he went to work for Shell in Africa. He began to write after “a monumental bash on the head”, sustained as an RAF pilot in World War II. Roald Dahl died in 1990.

Quentin Blake is one of the best-known and best-loved children’s illustrators and it’s impossible now to think of Roald Dahl’s writings without imagining Quentin Blake’s illustrations

I am currently trying to read through all of Roald Dahl’s books because growing up I loved the ones that I read. I originally read Charlie and the Chocolate factory when I was in middle school. I thought it was about time to finally read the second book.

Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator was a very interesting book. It was not what I expected and I was very disappointed by that. More than half of the book takes place in space and in an elevator. It has nothing to do with the Chocolate Factory at all.

Then for the second half of the book they go back to the Factory and the Umpa Lumpas sang multiple songs. Nothing else that happened really had anything to do with the Chocolate factory.

This book was a much let down compared to the first book. Unlike it’s predecessor, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, this book is probably a bit too far-fetched for it to grab the same amount of attention. There is still some great imagination, but there just seemed to be something completely lacking: possibly the very flimsy and thin plot and the rather annoying characters of Charlie’s bed-ridden grandparents.

Honestly, I was really bored during most of the book and it was hard to keep reading. This book has lost all the humour that was in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, the jokes are absurd and impossible to understand. At the beginning, the glass elevator goes too high and the passengers are stuck in space. We leave the Chocolate Factory and find ourselves in an uninteresting universe. It could have been nice for one chapter, that would have made an adventure for the characters before coming back to the Chocolate Factory, but it was complete nonsense for 12 chapters!

This sequel, it just didn’t work. One book would have been enough. It is true that the last third of the novel is rather nice but it is not enough to make up for a badly written book and a failed plot. My one piece of advice is that you should only read Charlie and the Chocolate Factory which is, by the way, an amazing book!

Overall, the book was very scattered and way over the top. It was a chore to get through, honestly, but I just had to see how it would all come together in the end. The characters felt completely different in this book compared to the first.Chat With Me

That’s it for this review! Have you read this book? If so, What did you think of it? Were you as disappointed in this as I was? Or did you actually enjoy it? Is it on your TBR? Tell me in the comments if you agree or disagree with any of this. I’d love to know your opinion.  

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Manga Madness Read-a-thon Wrap up (#MangaMadnessReadathon)

Manga Madness Readathonn (3).png

This is a bit late, but here is my Wrap up for #MangaMadnessReadathon. So, I hosted a Readathon, which went from January 7-13, 2018. There were 25 Challenges in the form of a Bingo Board.

Read a Manga in a Genre of your Choice (2)

Award Winning Manga – One Piece Volume 46-48 by Eiichiro Oda
Author/Artist you haven’t read before – Kiss him, Not me Volume 1 by Junko
Manga Centred around Folklore & Mythology – Hunter X Hunter Volume 1 by Yoshihiro Togashi
Romance, Slice of Life or Comedy – Kiss him, Not me Volume 2 by Junko
Drama, Action or Adventure – Hunter X Hunter Volume 2 by Junko

Fantasy or Paranormal – Bloody Mary Volume 8 by Akaza Samamiya (re-read)
Horror, Demons or Vampire – Bloody Mary Volume 9 by Akaza Samamiya (re-read)
Mystery, Thriller or Psychological – Death Note Volume 1 by Tsugumi Ohba
A Manga that is related to something you previously read – Tokyo Ghoul: re Volume 1 by Sui Ishida
A Manga with a male lead character – Hunter X Hunter Volume 3 by Yoshihiro Togashi

A Manga with a female lead character – Ouran High School Host Club Volume 2 by Bisco Hatori
Read two Installments from the same series – Hunter X Hunter Volume 4 & 5 by Yoshihiro Togashi
Read a Manga in a Genre of your choice – Kiss him, Not me Volume 3 by Junko
A Manga that was published in 2016/2017 – Bloom into you Volume 1 by Nakatani Nio
A Manga with a main character who transforms – Tokyo Mew Mew Volume 1 by Mia Ikumi

A Manga you’ve borrowed – Ouran High School Host Club Volume 1 by Bisco Hatori (re-read)
A Manga from a Genre you don’t usually read – Bloom into You Volume 2 by Nakatani Nio
A Manga with a main character who Identifies as LGBTQI+ – Bloom into you Volume 3 by Nakatani Nio
Read the Oldest Manga in your Collection – The Case Study of Vanitas Volume 1 by Jun Mochizuki (re-read)
A Manga by your Favourite Manga Artist – Crimson Shell by Jun Mochizuki

A Manga with a Name in the Title – The Case Study of Vanitas Volume 2 by Jun Mochizuki (re-read)
A Manga you’ve been meaning to read – Hunter X Hunter Volume 6 by Yoshihiro Togashi
A Manga that has been adapted to live action – Hunter X Hunter Volume 7 by Yoshihiro Togashi
A Manga that has not been adapted in any way – Bloom into you Volume 4 Nakatani Nio
A Manga that has been adapted to Anime or Video Game – Hunter X Hunter Volume 8 by Yoshihiro Togashi

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Did you participate in #MangaMadnessReadathon? Have you read any of these? If so, what did you think of them? Are any of these on your TBR? Let me know in the Comments!

If you want to know more about this readathon or want to know when the next round will take place, check out the official Twitter page, @MMReadathon! Are you interested in Participating next round? Let me know!